A performer’s guide to music of the Baroque period

The latest thinking on stylish performance presented in a clear, helpful and practical way. Includes chapters from leading experts on historical background, notation and interpretation, with specialist advice for keyboard, string and wind players, and singers. Book comes with a full-length CD of excerpts from authoritative recordings.

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A performer’s guide to music of the Classical period

The latest thinking on stylish performance presented in a clear, helpful and practical way. Includes chapters from leading experts on historical background, notation and interpretation, with specialist advice for keyboard, string, and wind players, and singers. The book comes with a full-length CD of excerpts from authoritative recordings.

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What is Baroque Music?

Derived from the Portuguese barroco, or “oddly shaped pearl,” the term “baroque” has been widely used since the nineteenth century to describe the period in Western European art music from about 1600 to 1750. Comparing some of music history’s greatest masterpieces to a misshapen pearl might seem strange to us today, but to the nineteenth century critics who applied the term, the music of Bach and Handel’s era sounded overly ornamented and exaggerated. Having long since shed its derogatory connotations, “baroque” is now simply a convenient catch-all for one of the richest and most diverse periods in music history.

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About the process of doing it together in Working-Art

This paper is an unfolding proposal of the studies carried out on the concepts of language through artistic practice. The production of activities by Allan Kaprow and the teaching artistry of Sandra Corazza are supported by the philosophy of Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari. Teaching practices are aimed at their potential for creation. The mechanisms of an artist’s language are evidenced and placed as developments for creating zones of approach and interaction with education. By these means, the concept of working-art is thought of as a way to escape from the given structures of teaching using reproductive models of programmed content.

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Baroque period

In the arts, Baroque is a period as well as the style that used exaggerated motion and clear, easily interpreted detail to produce drama, tension, exuberance, and grandeur in sculpture, painting, literature, dance, and music. The style started around 1600 in Rome, Italy and spread to most of Europe. In music, the Baroque applies to the final period of dominance of imitative counterpoint, where different voices and instruments echo each other but at different pitches, sometimes inverting the echo, and even reversing thematic material.

One of the defining aspects of music of the Baroque era was its connection to an expression of liturgical themes. Since many important composers of the era were in the employ of the church in Europe, sacred music composed for specific religious occasions was the norm. The rationale for composing for many composers of the Baroque era was to honor God.

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Leonardo da Vinci: a genius driven to distraction

Five hundred years have passed since the death of Leonardo da Vinci, and much has been written about him. Leonardo the artist, the scientist, the architect, the inventor, whose genius has been perceived as the allure of an unfathomable riddle. But some of the words written about Leonardo after he died at Clos-Lucé in France on 2 May 1519, hint at a very different man to the one many of us presume to know. According to his first biographer Giorgio Vasari, Leonardo died lamenting ‘that he had offended God and mankind in not having worked at his art as he should have done’ (Vasari, 1996; Nicholl, 2004; Vecce, 2006).

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Nikolay Bogdanov-Belsky

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Leonardo da Vinci

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