Drama for developing integrity in Higher Education

Developing academic integrity is context-based and ineffective through formal courses. The article explores the meanings of academic integrity, reviews the literature on educational strategies towards its development and presents the design and results of the author’s research on how drama may augment the development of academic integrity of MBA students in the innovation camp setting. The philosophical framework for integrity learning and its perception by students comes from Bakhtin’s dialogical theory of self and critical pedagogy of Freire. Drama is offered as a learning medium which provides context to explore multiple perspectives and imaginary dialogues of characters who may take ethically dubious positions. Assessment of integrity at the input stage and after completion of the drama sessions was two-fold. A self-efficacy test was used for standardized measurement and sociometry was applied to asses four areas of ethical education: (1) being sensitive to ethical dilemmas at stake; (2) reasoning/reflective skills and; (3) motivation/conviction to give over other considerations to the values, principles, or ideals that prompt the action to be taken; (4) strategizing to act ethically. The findings suggest that drama effectively augments the development of otherwise stable integrity of MBS students by making them more optimistic about their courage to adhere to values in face of adversity, especially to defend diversity as a human right and pre-condition for innovation. This article is published as part of a collection on integrity and its counterfeits.

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Art History Books for Beginners

Art history can be intimidating. Seemingly composed of countless movements, mediums, artists, and styles, diving into the study may seem daunting. However, with the right book collection, you’ll realize that an understanding of art history is not only possible but surprisingly attainable. After all, as Ralph Waldo Emerson famously claimed, “every artist was first an amateur.”

So, whether you’re considering a career in arts management, an artist looking to learn more about the story of your practice, or simply curious about art’s evolution, these must-have books for budding art historians belong on your shelf!

Here’s a selection of the best art history books for beginners.

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Famous Artists and their Inspiration

Throughout art history, most prolific painters have employed different kinds of iconography in order to demonstrate the diversity of their interests, skills, and approach. No matter how many different themes they explore, however, most of these figures still have an apparent favorite subject.

From Rembrandt’s pensive face to Yayoi Kusama’s playful polka dots, these tried-and-true subjects offer a revealing look into the inner-workings of these creative minds. Here, we explore the favored muses of 8 famous artists in order to learn more about what inspired and influenced each important figure.

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Leonardo Da Vinci’s Notebooks Online

Tanks to the British Library, we can go inside the mind of a genius and peruse Leonardo Da Vinci’s notebooks. The first true Renaissance Man, Da Vinci not only painted the Mona Lisa but was a master inventor who is sometimes credited with creating the parachute and helicopter. And, to top it all off, he wrote his notes backward, in mirror image from right to left.

Who wouldn’t want to understand more about what this master of painting, drawing, engineering, and mathematics was thinking? Now you can flip through 570 pages of his notebook The Codex Arundel. Works of art themselves, the pages date from 1480 to 1518, and are a fascinating glimpse into Da Vinci’s process. Interestingly, for a man, so in tune with technology, the artist never attempted to publish his notebooks during his lifetime. Instead, they were left to his pupil Francesco Melzi and individual sheets have since been dispersed among wealthy collectors, many ending up in museum collections.

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For The Artist, Age Has Its Advantages

The story of a senior actively engaged in the arts is not as extraordinary as our culture might have us believe.

Anna Mary “Grandma Moses” Robertson began painting in her late 70s. Frank Lloyd Wright finished designing the Guggenheim Museum when he was 91. Michelangelo assumed the role of architect of St. Peter’s Basilica when he was 72. Cuban-born minimalist Carmen Herrera had her first major sale of a painting at age 89. Her works now hang in the Museum of Modern Art, the Hirshhorn Museum, and the Tate. At an age when society regards too many elders as invisible, Herrera became something of a phenom in the art world. As a New York Times, art critic asked, “How can we have missed these beautiful compositions?”

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A new educational initiative – makes Music a priority

For the past 5 months, the students from North Cambridge Academy and Sir Harry Smith Community College have been training alongside professional musicians thanks to an innovative music programme that seeks to close a gap in school education.

The three-year project focuses on helping students develop both vocal and instrumental skills through regular workshops with professional musicians from Cambridge University’s Associate Ensemble VOCES8 and The Brook Street Band. Using the ‘VOCES8 method’, teachers and students are encouraged to learn through participation, using vocal and rhythmic exercises that develop their music skills and confidence.

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Musical pleasure and musical emotions

In a pharmacological study published in PNAS, Ferreri et al. (1) present evidence that enhancing or inhibiting dopamine signaling using levodopa or risperidone modulates the pleasure experienced while listening to music. This result is the latest development in an already remarkable series of studies by the groups of Robert Zatorre and Antoni Rodriguez-Fornells on the implication of the reward system in musical emotions. In their seminal 2001 study, Blood and Zatorre (2) used the PET imaging technique to show that episodes of peak emotional responses to music (or musical “chills”) were associated with increased blood flow in the ventral striatum, the amygdala, and other brain regions associated with emotion and reward. In a 2011 follow-up study, Salimpoor et al. (3) then relied on [11C]raclopride PET—a technique that allows estimating dopamine release in cerebral tissue—to show that peak emotional arousal during music listening is associated with the simultaneous release of dopamine in the bilateral dorsal and ventral striatum.

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